meditation

yin yoga: meditation (not quite) in motion – part 1

What’s your favorite position for meditation? The vast majority of us probably do it while seated (no small coincidence that “sitting” is often used as a synonym for meditation). In fact, the Buddha taught four positions appropriate for meditation: sitting,

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who am i? simple meditations on a timeless question

“Who am I?” is one of those existential questions in the same league as “What is the meaning of life?” and “Why me?” As yogis and meditators, we’re probably more inclined than most people to approach the question with sincerity.

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metta: meditating on lovingkindness (part 1)

“The mind actually is something like tofu.” (Sylvia Boorstein) When the great contemporary meditation teacher Sylvia Boorstein makes this statement, she isn’t implying that our minds are mushy, or boring, or edible. Instead, she refers to tofu’s ability to take

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meditation used as a form of activism…engage you consciousness

It’s probably safe to say that most people who meditate do so because it provides a sense of inner peace. We know, scientifically and anecdotally, that it relieves stress, changes the way our brains function, and can even make us

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rounding out sensory meditation with taste and smell, trigger your state of mind..

We conclude our series on meditating with the five senses by looking at taste and smell together, and introduce a technique for incorporating them into a five-sense meditation practice. The sense of smell may seem an odd choice as a

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meditating with sound: the noise outside and inside your head

In recent weeks we’ve explored how physical sensation, or the sense of touch, can support meditation practice. Our inquiry into meditating with the five senses continues with hearing and sound.  Close your eyes for just a few seconds and imagine

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pain with gain: using physical sensations in the body as an object for meditation

Last week we explored practical ways to use physical sensations–the sense of touch–to hold our awareness in meditation. This week, we take a deeper look at how pain can be a powerful tool to support the practice. Sooner or later,

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exploration with touch: using physical sensations in the body as an object for meditation

Previously we were introduced to the concept of using the five senses as focal points in meditation practice. This week we begin our exploration with touch, or physical sensation. Whenever we sit (or walk, or lie down) in meditation, our

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meditation and the five senses – Letting go of your sensory inputs and looking inward

“The senses are like a mirror. Turned outward, they reflect the outside; turned inward, they reflect pure light. By themselves the senses are innocent, but when allowed to turn outside they attract everything and transfer those messages to the mind,

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the joy of failure – How to move with/past obstacles when starting a meditation practice.

Imagine sitting down and closing your eyes, expecting, as the Beatles song says, to “turn off your mind, relax and float downstream.” Within seconds, you’re thinking about dinner. Or the assignment the boss dropped in your lap at the eleventh

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